Sept-Îles tonnage records in sight with new dock

Sept-Îles tonnage records in sight with new dock

by Mark Cardwell

The Port of Sept-Îles will likely fall a few million tonnes short in 2019 of its all-time annual record of 35 million tonnes for volume handled.

But that record will fall in 2020 and in the years that follow, top port officials say, now that the multiuser dock in the Pointe-Noire sector is fully operational.

“It’s running smoothly and efficiently,” says Pierre Gagnon, President & CEO of the Port of Sept-Îles since 2002.  “We’re happy and proud of this new world class asset that will help the port and the iron ore industry to grow in the future.” (more…)

Prince Rupert: Major projects receive federal financing

Prince Rupert: Major projects receive federal financing

By Keith Norbury

Three major projects, with a combined value of over $300 million, are planned for Port of Prince Rupert in the next few years. To support those projects — a major railway bridge upgrade, new rail infrastructure to support an export logistics platform project, and an import logistics park on First Nations land — the federal government recently announced grants totalling $153.7 million.

The money, from the National Trade Corridors Fund, will provide about half the cash for the three projects, which are key elements of the Port’s plans to double its cargo volumes with the next decade to over 50 million tonnes annually. “What they supported are our top-priority strategic projects, both from a capacity standpoint, but also a resiliency standpoint,” said Shaun Stevenson, President and CEO of Prince Rupert Port Authority. “We were obviously very pleased to learn of the level of support and that the three projects we had put forward were supported.“ Mr. Stevenson added that the financing is a validation that the federal government “recognizes the strategic role that Prince Rupert is playing in Canadian trade.” (more…)

Vancouver gets ridesharing – what will it do to a heavily congested city?

Vancouver gets ridesharing – what will it do to a heavily congested city?

By R. Bruce Striegler

After tolerating the dubious distinction of being the only major location in North America where ridesharing services like Uber or Lyft have been prevented from operating, residents and visitors to British Columbia will soon have the option of using a rideshare service to get where they’re going. In July this year, the government of British Columbia announced its regulations on licensing and insurance for rideshare firms to operate in B.C., while inviting companies to apply to operate through the Passenger Transportation Board. Claire Trevena, the Province’s Transportation Minister, said, “Our plan has made it possible for ride-hailing companies to apply to enter the market this fall, with vehicles on the road later this year, while ensuring the safety of passengers and promoting accessibility options in the industry.” She continued, saying, “British Columbians have been asking and waiting for these services after more than five years of delay by the former government. We took action to allow for the services people want and we’re delivering on that promise.” What the Minister didn’t say in her announcement was that on top of the five years of waiting under the previous government, the public further waited another three years under her government. (more…)